Thumbnails Outlines
House Calendar
Friday, April 18, 2014
102nd DAY OF THE ADJOURNED SESSION
House Convenes at 9:30 A.M.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page No.
ACTION CALENDAR
Third Reading
H. 870
The merger of the Town of Pittsford and the Pittsford Fire District No.
1 ................................................................................................................... 2109
Favorable with Amendment
S. 299
An act relating to sampler flights ..................................................... 2109
Rep. Stevens for General, Housing and Military Affairs
Action Postponed Until April 23, 2014
Senate Proposal of Amendment
H. 356
Prohibiting littering in or on the waters of the State ....................... 2111
NOTICE CALENDAR
Favorable
S. 234
An act relating to Medicaid coverage for home telemonitoring services
..................................................................................................................... 2111
Rep. Hoyt for Health Care
Senate Proposal of Amendment
H. 112
The labeling of food produced with genetic engineering ................ 2112
H. 260
Electronic insurance notices and credit for reinsurance .................. 2122
H. 483
Adopting revisions to Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code 2122
Ordered to Lie
S. 91
An act relating to privatization of public schools .............................. 2123
Consent Calendar
H.C.R. 309
Congratulating the Reporter newspaper on winning eight 2014
New England Newspaper and Press Association awards ............................ 2123
H.C.R. 310
Congratulating the Town of Weybridge on winning State and
Addison County honors in the Vermont Home Energy Challenge ............. 2123
H.C.R. 311
Congratulating 2014 Vermont Spelling Bee champion, Liam
Lustberg ....................................................................................................... 2123
H.C.R. 312
Congratulating the 2014 Division II Lyndon Institute Vikings
championship boys’ basketball team ........................................................... 2123
H.C.R. 313
Congratulating the 2014 Proctor High School Lady Phantoms
Division IV championship girls’ basketball team ....................................... 2123
H.C.R. 314
Congratulating the 2013 Peoples Academy Lady Wolves Division
III championship girls’ soccer team ............................................................ 2123
H.C.R. 315
Congratulating the 2014 Danville High School Division IV
championship boys’ basketball team ........................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 316
Commemorating the third annual Turkic Cultural Day in Vermont
..................................................................................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 317
Congratulating the 2014 Mt. Abraham Union High School
Division II championship girls’ basketball team ......................................... 2124
H.C.R. 318
Commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Plattsburgh
and honoring those who fought on Lake Champlain’s western shore ......... 2124
H.C.R. 319
Congratulating Chloe Johnson of Fairfield on her service as the
2013 Miss Vermont Outstanding Teen ........................................................ 2124
H.C.R. 320
In memory of Brandon Allen Gleason of Enosburg Falls ....... 2124
H.C.R. 321
Congratulating the 2014 Black River High School State rock
climbing championship team ....................................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 322
Designating April 23, 2014 as Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans
Honor and Appreciation Day and recognizing their service and sacrifice on
behalf of our nation ..................................................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 323
Congratulating the 2014 University of Vermont Catamounts
America East Regular Season title winning men’s basketball team ........... 2124
H.C.R. 324
Congratulating the Vermont-associated 2014 U.S. Winter Olympic
Team members ............................................................................................ 2124
H.C.R. 325
Congratulating Jeanelle Achee of Rochester on her service as the
2013 Miss Vermont ..................................................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 326
Congratulating the 2013 Randolph Union High School Galloping
Ghosts Division II championship baseball team ......................................... 2124
H.C.R. 327
Congratulating Madison Cota on being named the 2014 Miss
Vermont Teen USA ..................................................................................... 2124
H.C.R. 328
Commemorating the 150th anniversary of the St. Albans Raid2125
H.C.R. 329
Designating April 30, 2014 as National Walk@Lunch Day in
Vermont ....................................................................................................... 2125
S.C.R. 55
Senate concurrent resolution congratulating the NorthWoods
Stewardship Center on its 25th anniversary ................................................ 2125
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ORDERS OF THE DAY
ACTION CALENDAR
Third Reading
H. 870
An act relating to the merger of the Town of Pittsford and the Pittsford Fire
District No. 1
Favorable with Amendment
S. 299
An act relating to sampler flights
Rep. Stevens of Waterbury,
for the Committee on
General, Housing and
Military Affairs,
recommends that the House propose to the Senate that the
bill be amended by striking all after the enacting clause and inserting in lieu
thereof the following:
Sec. 1.
PURPOSE
The purpose of this act is to allow wholesale dealers to offer tastings of malt
or vinous beverages to the management and staff of businesses who have
applied for first- or second-class licenses but have yet to receive the license
from the Department of Liquor Control, provided that the local control
commission has approved the liquor license.
This will enable the management
of new businesses to taste and choose malt or vinous beverages and to print
their menus and otherwise make the start-up of their businesses easier.
Sec. 2.
7 V.S.A. § 67 is amended to read:
§ 67.
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE TASTINGS; PERMIT; PENALTIES
* * *
(d)
Promotional alcoholic beverage tasting:
* * *
(4)
Upon receipt of a
first- or second-class application by the
Department, a holder of a wholesale dealer’s license may dispense malt or
vinous
beverages
for
promotional
purposes
without
charge
to
invited
management and staff of a business that has applied for a first- or second-class
license, provided they are of legal drinking age.
The event shall be held on the
premises of the first- or second-class applicant.
The first- or second-class
applicant shall be responsible for complying with all applicable laws under this
title.
No malt or vinous beverages shall be left behind.
No permit is required
under this subdivision, but the wholesale dealer shall provide written notice of
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the event to the Department at least five days prior to the date of the tasting.
The Department shall post notice of the pending application on its website.
* * *
Sec. 3.
7 V.S.A. § 2 is amended to read:
§ 2.
DEFINITIONS
The following words as used in this title, unless a contrary meaning is
required by the context, shall have the following meaning:
* * *
(37)
“Sampler flight”
means a flight, ski, paddle, or any similar device
by design or name intended to hold alcoholic beverage samples for the purpose
of comparison.
Sec. 4.
7 V.S.A. § 222 is amended to read:
§ 222.
FIRST AND SECOND CLASS FIRST- AND SECOND-CLASS
LICENSES, GRANTING OF; SALE TO MINORS; CONTRACTING
FOR FOOD SERVICE
With the approval of the Liquor Control Board, the Control Commissioners
may grant to a retail dealer for the premises where the dealer carries on
business the following:
* * *
(5)(A)
The holder of a first-class license may serve a sampler flight of
up to 32 ounces in the aggregate of malt beverages to a single customer at one
time;
(B)
The holder of a first-class license may serve a sampler flight of
up to 12 ounces in the aggregate of vinous beverages to a single customer at
one time; and
(C)
The holder of a third-class license may serve a sampler flight of
up to four ounces in the aggregate of spirituous liquors to a single customer at
one time.
Sec. 5.
7 V.S.A. § 66 is amended to read:
§ 66.
MALT AND VINOUS BEVERAGE SHIPPING LICENSE; IN STATE;
OUT OF STATE; PROHIBITIONS; PENALTIES
* * *
(c)
A manufacturer or rectifier of vinous beverages that is licensed in-state
or out-of-state and holds valid state State and federal permits and operates a
winery in the United States, may apply for a retail shipping license by filing
with the Department of Liquor Control an application in a form required by the
Department accompanied by a copy of its in-state or out-of-state license and
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the fee as required by subdivision 231(a)(7)(C) of this title.
The retail shipping
license may be renewed annually by filing the renewal fee as required by
subdivision 231(a)(7)(C) of this title accompanied by the licensee’s current in-
state or out-of-state manufacturer’s license.
This license permits the holder,
which includes the holder’s affiliates, franchises, and subsidiaries, to sell up to
5,000 gallons of vinous beverages a year directly to first first- or second class
second-class licensees and deliver the beverages by common carrier or, the
manufacturer’s or rectifier’s own vehicles vehicle, or the vehicle of an
employee of a manufacturer or rectifier, provided that the beverages are sold
on invoice, and no more than 100 gallons per month are sold to any single first
first- or second class second-class licensee.
The retail shipping license holder
shall report to the Department documentation of the annual and monthly
number of gallons sold.
Vinous beverages under this section may be delivered
by the vehicle of a second-class license holder if the second-class licensee
cannot obtain the vinous beverages from a wholesale dealer.
* * *
Sec. 6.
EFFECTIVE DATE
This act shall take effect on July 1, 2014.
(Committee vote: 7-0-1 )
(For text see Senate Journal 2/7/2014 )
Action Postponed Until April 23, 2014
Senate Proposal of Amendment
H. 356
An act relating to prohibiting littering in or on the waters of the State.
Pending Question: Shall the House concur in the Senate Proposal of
Amendment?
NOTICE CALENDAR
Favorable
S. 234
An act relating to Medicaid coverage for home telemonitoring services
Rep. Hoyt of Norwich,
for the Committee on
Health Care
, recommends
that the bill ought to pass in concurrence.
(Committee Vote: 11-0-0)
(For text see Senate Journal March 20, 2014 )
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Senate Proposal of Amendment
H. 112
An act relating to the labeling of food produced with genetic engineering
The Senate proposes to the House to amend the bill by striking all after the
enacting clause and inserting in lieu thereof the following:
Sec. 1.
FINDINGS
The General Assembly finds and declares that:
(1)
U.S. federal law does not provide for the labeling of food that is
produced with genetic engineering, as evidenced by the following:
(A)
U.S. federal labeling and food and drug laws do not require
manufacturers of food produced with genetic engineering to label such food as
genetically engineered.
(B)
As indicated by the testimony of a U.S. Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) Supervisory Consumer Safety Officer, the FDA has
statutory authority to require labeling of food products, but does not consider
genetically engineered foods to be materially different from their traditional
counterparts to require such labeling.
(C)
No formal FDA policy on the labeling of genetically engineered
foods has been adopted.
Currently, the FDA only provides nonbinding
guidance on the labeling of genetically engineered foods, including a 1992
draft guidance regarding labeling of food produced from genetic engineering
and a 2001 draft guidance for industry regarding voluntary labeling of food
produced from genetic engineering.
(2)
U.S. federal law does not require independent testing of the safety of
food produced with genetic engineering, as evidenced by the following:
(A)
In
its
regulation
of
food,
the
FDA
does
not
distinguish
genetically
engineered
foods
from
foods
developed
by
traditional
plant
breeding.
(B)
Under its regulatory framework, the FDA does not independently
test the safety of genetically engineered foods.
Instead, manufacturers submit
safety research and studies, the majority of which the manufacturers finance or
conduct.
The FDA reviews the manufacturers’ research and reports through a
voluntary
safety
consultation,
and
issues
a
letter
to
the
manufacturer
acknowledging the manufacturer’s conclusion regarding the safety of the
genetically engineered food product being tested.
(C)
The FDA does not use meta-studies or other forms of statistical
- 2113 -
analysis to verify that the studies it reviews are not biased by financial or
professional conflicts of interest.
(D)
There is a lack of consensus regarding the validity of the research
and
science
surrounding
the
safety
of
genetically
engineered
foods,
as
indicated by the fact that there are peer-reviewed studies published in
international scientific literature showing negative, neutral, and positive health
results.
(E)
There have been no long-term or epidemiologic studies in the
United States that examine the safety of human consumption of genetically
engineered foods.
(F)
Independent scientists may be limited from conducting safety and
risk-assessment research of genetically engineered materials used in food
products due to industry restrictions or patent restrictions on the use for
research of those genetically engineered materials used in food products.
(3)
Genetically engineered foods are increasingly available for human
consumption, as evidenced by the fact that:
(A)
it is estimated that up to 80 percent of the processed foods sold in
the United States are at least partially produced from genetic engineering; and
(B)
according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in 2012,
genetically engineered soybeans accounted for 93 percent of U.S. soybean
acreage, and genetically engineered corn accounted for 88 percent of U.S. corn
acreage.
(4)
Genetically engineered foods potentially pose risks to health, safety,
agriculture, and the environment, as evidenced by the following:
(A)
There are conflicting studies assessing the health consequences
of food produced from genetic engineering.
(B)
The genetic engineering of plants and animals may cause
unintended consequences.
(C)
The
use of
genetically
engineered
crops
is increasing
in
commodity agricultural production practices, which contribute to genetic
homogeneity, loss of biodiversity, and increased vulnerability of crops to pests,
diseases, and variable climate conditions.
(D)
Cross-pollination
of
or
cross-contamination
by
genetically
engineered crops may contaminate organic crops and, consequently, affect
marketability of those crops.
(E)
Cross-pollination from genetically engineered crops may have an
adverse
effect
on
native
flora
and
fauna.
The
transfer
of
unnatural
- 2114 -
deoxyribonucleic acid to wild relatives can lead to displacement of those native
plants, and in turn, displacement of the native fauna dependent on those wild
varieties.
(5)
For multiple health, personal, religious, and environmental reasons,
the State of Vermont finds that food produced from genetic engineering should
be labeled as such, as evidenced by the following:
(A)
Public opinion polls conducted by the Center for Rural Studies at
the University of Vermont indicate that a large majority of Vermonters want
foods produced with genetic engineering to be labeled as such.
(B)
Polling by the New York Times indicated that many consumers
are under an incorrect assumption about whether the food they purchase is
produced from genetic engineering, and labeling food as produced from
genetic engineering will reduce consumer confusion or deception regarding the
food they purchase.
(C)
Because genetic engineering, as regulated by this act, involves
the direct injection of genes into cells, the fusion of cells, or the hybridization
of genes that does not occur in nature, labeling foods produced with genetic
engineering as “natural,” “naturally made,” “naturally grown,” “all natural,” or
other similar descriptors is inherently misleading, poses a risk of confusing or
deceiving consumers, and conflicts with the general perception that “natural”
foods are not genetically engineered.
(D)
Persons with certain religious beliefs object to producing foods
using genetic engineering because of objections to tampering with the genetic
makeup of life forms and the rapid introduction and proliferation of genetically
engineered organisms and, therefore, need food to be labeled as genetically
engineered in order to conform to religious beliefs and comply with dietary
restrictions.
(E)
Labeling gives consumers information they can use to make
decisions about what products they would prefer to purchase.
(6)
Because both the FDA and the U.S. Congress do not require the
labeling of food produced with genetic engineering, the State should require
food produced with genetic engineering to be labeled as such in order to serve
the interests of the State, notwithstanding limited exceptions, to prevent
inadvertent consumer deception, prevent potential risks to human health,
protect religious practices, and protect the environment.
Sec. 2.
9 V.S.A. chapter 82A is added to read:
CHAPTER 82A.
LABELING OF FOOD PRODUCED WITH GENETIC
ENGINEERING
- 2115 -
§ 3041.
PURPOSE
It is the purpose of this chapter to:
(1)
Public health and food safety.
Establish a system by which persons
may make informed decisions regarding the potential health effects of the food
they purchase and consume and by which, if they choose, persons may avoid
potential health risks of food produced from genetic engineering.
(2)
Environmental
impacts.
Inform
the
purchasing
decisions
of
consumers who are concerned about the potential environmental effects of the
production of food from genetic engineering.
(3)
Consumer confusion and deception.
Reduce and prevent consumer
confusion and deception by prohibiting the labeling of products produced from
genetic engineering as “natural” and by promoting the disclosure of factual
information on food labels to allow consumers to make informed decisions.
(4)
Protecting religious practices.
Provide consumers with data from
which they may make informed decisions for religious reasons.
§ 3042.
DEFINITIONS
As used in this chapter:
(1)
“Consumer” shall have the same meaning as in subsection 2451a(a)
of this title.
(2)
“Enzyme” means a protein that catalyzes chemical reactions of other
substances without itself being destroyed or altered upon completion of the
reactions.
(3)
“Food” means food intended for human consumption.
(4)
“Genetic engineering” is a process by which a food is produced from
an organism or organisms in which the genetic material has been changed
through the application of:
(A)
in
vitro
nucleic
acid
techniques,
including
recombinant
deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) techniques and the direct injection of nucleic
acid into cells or organelles; or
(B)
fusion of cells (including protoplast fusion) or hybridization
techniques that overcome natural physiological, reproductive, or recombination
barriers, where the donor cells or protoplasts do not fall within the same
taxonomic group, in a way that does not occur by natural multiplication or
natural recombination.
(5)
“In vitro nucleic acid techniques” means techniques, including
recombinant DNA or ribonucleic acid techniques, that use vector systems and
- 2116 -
techniques involving the direct introduction into the organisms of hereditary
materials
prepared
outside
the
organisms
such
as
micro-injection,
chemoporation, electroporation, micro-encapsulation, and liposome fusion.
(6)
“Manufacturer” means a person who:
(A)
produces a processed food or raw agricultural commodity under
its own brand or label for sale in or into the State;
(B)
sells in or into the State under its own brand or label a processed
food or raw agricultural commodity produced by another supplier;
(C)
owns a brand that it licenses or licensed to another person for use
on a processed food or raw commodity sold in or into the State;
(D)
sells in, sells into, or distributes in the State a processed food or
raw agricultural commodity that it packaged under a brand or label owned by
another person;
(E)
imports into the United States for sale in or into the State a
processed food or raw agricultural commodity produced by a person without a
presence in the United States; or
(F)
produces a processed food or raw agricultural commodity for sale
in or into the State without affixing a brand name.
(7)
“Organism” means any biological entity capable of replication,
reproduction, or transferring of genetic material.
(8)
“Processed food” means any food other than a raw agricultural
commodity
and
includes
any
food
produced
from
a
raw
agricultural
commodity that has been subjected to processing such as canning, smoking,
pressing, cooking, freezing, dehydration, fermentation, or milling.
(9)
“Processing aid” means:
(A)
a substance that is added to a food during the processing of the
food but that is removed in some manner from the food before the food is
packaged in its finished form;
(B)
a substance that is added to a food during processing, is
converted into constituents normally present in the food, and does not
significantly increase the amount of the constituents naturally found in the
food; or
(C)
a substance that is added to a food for its technical or functional
effect in the processing but is present in the finished food at levels that do not
have any technical or functional effect in that finished food.
(10)
“Raw agricultural commodity” means any food in its raw or natural
- 2117 -
state, including any fruit or vegetable that is washed, colored, or otherwise
treated in its unpeeled natural form prior to marketing.
§ 3043.
LABELING OF FOOD PRODUCED WITH GENETIC
ENGINEERING
(a)
Except as set forth in section 3044 of this title, food offered for sale by
a retailer after July 1, 2016 shall be labeled as produced entirely or in part from
genetic engineering if it is a product:
(1)
offered for retail sale in Vermont; and
(2)
entirely or partially produced with genetic engineering.
(b)
If a food is required to be labeled under subsection (a) of this section, it
shall be labeled as follows:
(1)
in
the
case
of
a
packaged
raw
agricultural
commodity,
the
manufacturer shall label the package offered for retail sale, with the clear and
conspicuous words “produced with genetic engineering”;
(2)
in the case of any raw agricultural commodity that is not separately
packaged, the retailer shall post a label appearing on the retail store shelf or bin
in which the commodity is displayed for sale with the clear and conspicuous
words “produced with genetic engineering”; or
(3)
in the case of any processed food that contains a product or products
of genetic engineering, the manufacturer shall label the package in which the
processed food is offered for sale with the words: “partially produced with
genetic
engineering”;
“may
be
produced
with
genetic
engineering”;
or
“produced with genetic engineering.”
(c)
Except as set forth under section 3044 of this title, a manufacturer of a
food produced entirely or in part from genetic engineering shall not label the
product on the package, in signage, or in advertising as “natural,” “naturally
made,” “naturally grown,” “all natural,” or any words of similar import that
would have a tendency to mislead a consumer.
(d)
This section and the requirements of this chapter shall not be construed
to require:
(1)
the listing or identification of any ingredient or ingredients that were
genetically engineered; or
(2)
the placement of the term “genetically engineered” immediately
preceding any common name or primary product descriptor of a food.
§ 3044.
EXEMPTIONS
The following foods shall not be subject to the labeling requirements of
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section 3043 of this title:
(1)
Food consisting entirely of or derived entirely from an animal which
has not itself been produced with genetic engineering, regardless of whether
the animal has been fed or injected with any food, drug, or other substance
produced with genetic engineering.
(2)
A raw agricultural commodity or processed food derived from it that
has been grown, raised, or produced without the knowing or intentional use of
food or seed produced with genetic engineering.
Food will be deemed to be as
described in this subdivision only if the person otherwise responsible for
complying with the requirements of subsection 3043(a) of this title with
respect to a raw agricultural commodity or processed food obtains, from
whomever sold the raw agricultural commodity or processed food to that
person, a sworn statement that the raw agricultural commodity or processed
food
has
not
been
knowingly
or
intentionally
produced
with
genetic
engineering and has been segregated from and has not been knowingly or
intentionally commingled with food that may have been produced with genetic
engineering at any time.
In providing such a sworn statement, any person may
rely on a sworn statement from his or her own supplier that contains the
affirmation set forth in this subdivision.
(3)
Any processed food which would be subject to subsection 3043(a) of
this title solely because it includes one or more processing aids or enzymes
produced with genetic engineering.
(4)
Any beverage that is subject to the provisions of Title 7.
(5)
Any processed food that would be subject to subsection 3043(a) of
this title solely because it includes one or more materials that have been
produced with genetic engineering, provided that the genetically engineered
materials in the aggregate do not account for more than 0.9 percent of the total
weight of the processed food.
(6)
Food that an independent organization has verified has not been
knowingly or intentionally produced from or commingled with food or seed
produced with genetic engineering.
The Office of the Attorney General, after
consultation with the Department of Health, shall approve by procedure the
independent organizations from which verification shall be acceptable under
this subdivision (6).
(7)
Food that is not packaged for retail sale and that is:
(A)
a processed food prepared and intended for immediate human
consumption; or
(B)
served, sold, or otherwise provided in any restaurant or other
- 2119 -
food establishment, as defined in 18 V.S.A. § 4301, that is primarily engaged
in the sale of food prepared and intended for immediate human consumption.
(8)
Medical food, as that term is defined in 21 U.S.C. § 360ee(b)(3).
§ 3045.
RETAILER LIABILITY
(a)
A retailer shall not be liable for the failure to label a processed food as
required by section 3043 of this title, unless the retailer is the producer or
manufacturer of the processed food.
(b)
A retailer shall not be held liable for failure to label a raw agricultural
commodity as required by section 3043 of this title, provided that the retailer,
within 30 days of any proposed enforcement action or notice of violation,
obtains a sworn statement in accordance with subdivision 3044(2) of this title.
§ 3046.
SEVERABILITY
If any provision of this chapter or its application to any person or
circumstance is held invalid or in violation of the Constitution or laws of the
United States or in violation of the Constitution or laws of Vermont, the
invalidity or the violation shall not affect other provisions of this section which
can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end,
the provisions of this chapter are severable.
§ 3047.
FALSE CERTIFICATION
It shall be a violation of this chapter for a person knowingly to provide a
false statement under subdivision 3044(2) of this title that a raw agricultural
commodity or processed food has not been
knowingly or intentionally
produced with genetic engineering and has been segregated from and has not
been knowingly or intentionally commingled with food that may have been
produced with genetic engineering at any time.
§ 3048.
PENALTIES; ENFORCEMENT
(a)
Any person who violates the requirements of this chapter shall be liable
for
a
civil
penalty
of
not
more
than
$1,000.00
per day,
per product.
Calculation of the civil penalty shall not be made or multiplied by the number
of individual packages of the same product displayed or offered for retail sale.
Civil penalties assessed under this section shall accrue and be assessed per
each uniquely named, designated, or marketed product.
(b)
The Attorney General shall have the same authority to make rules,
conduct civil investigations, enter into assurances of discontinuance, and bring
civil actions as provided under subchapter 1 of chapter 63 of this title.
Consumers shall have the same rights and remedies as provided under
subchapter 1 of chapter 63 of this title.
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Sec. 3.
ATTORNEY GENERAL RULEMAKING; LABELING OF FOOD
PRODUCED WITH GENETIC ENGINEERING
The
Attorney
General
may
adopt
by
rule
requirements
for
the
implementation of 9 V.S.A. chapter 82A, including:
(1)
a requirement that the label required for food produced from genetic
engineering include a disclaimer that the Food and Drug Administration does
not consider foods produced from genetic engineering to be materially
different from other foods; and
(2)
notwithstanding
the
labeling
language
required
by
9
V.S.A.
§ 3043(a), a requirement that a label required under 9 V.S.A. chapter 82A
identify food produced entirely or in part from genetic engineering in a manner
consistent with requirements in other jurisdictions for the labeling of food,
including the labeling of food produced with genetic engineering.
Sec. 4.
GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD LABELING SPECIAL
FUND
(a)
There is established a Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Special
Fund, pursuant to 32 V.S.A. chapter 7, subchapter 5 to pay costs or liabilities
incurred
by
the
Attorney
General
or
the
State
in
implementation
and
administration, including rulemaking, of the requirements under 9 V.S.A.
chapter 82A for the labeling of food produced from genetic engineering.
(b)
The Fund shall consist of:
(1)
private gifts, bequests, grants, or donations of any amount made to
the State from any public or private source for the purposes for which the Fund
was established;
(2)
except for those recoveries that by law are appropriated for other
uses, up to $1,500,000.00 of settlement monies collected by the Office of the
Attorney General that, as determined by the Office of the Attorney General
after consultation with the Joint Fiscal Office and the Department of Finance
and Management, exceed the estimated amounts of settlement proceeds in
the July 2014 official revenue forecast issued under 32 V.S.A. § 305a for
fiscal year 2015; and
(3)
such sums as may be appropriated or transferred by the General
Assembly.
(c)
Monies in the Fund from settlement monies collected by the Office of
the Attorney General or from funds appropriated or transferred by the General
Assembly shall be disbursed only if monies in the Fund from private gifts,
bequests, grants, or donations are insufficient to the Attorney General to pay
the costs or liabilities of the Attorney General or the State incurred in
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implementation and administration of the requirements of 9 V.S.A. chapter
82A.
(d)
On or after July 1, 2018, if the Attorney General is not involved in
ongoing litigation regarding the requirements of 9 V.S.A. chapter 82A and
monies in the Fund exceed the costs or liabilities of the Attorney General or
the State:
(1)
unexpended monies in the Fund received from private or public
sources shall be appropriated by the General Assembly, after review by the
Senate and House Committees on Appropriations, the Senate Committee on
Agriculture, and the House Committee on Agriculture and Forest Products, for
the support of agricultural activities or agricultural purposes in the State,
including promotion of value-added products, compliance with water quality
requirements, and marketing assistance and development; and
(2)
unexpended State monies in the Fund shall revert to the General
Fund.
Sec. 5.
ATTORNEY GENERAL FISCAL YEAR BUDGET
If, in fiscal year 2015, $1,500,000.00 in monies is not collected in the
Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Special Fund established under Sec. 4
of this act, the Attorney General shall request in the fiscal year 2016 budget
proposal for the Office of the Attorney General the monies necessary to
implement and administer the requirements established by 9 V.S.A. chapter
82A for the labeling of food produced from genetic engineering.
Sec. 6.
ATTORNEY GENERAL REPORT ON LABELING OF MILK
(a)
On or before January 15, 2015, the Office of the Attorney General, after
consultation with the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, shall submit
to the Senate and House Committees on the Judiciary, the Senate Committee
on Agriculture, and the House Committee on Agriculture and Forest Products a
report regarding whether milk and milk products should be subject to the
labeling requirements of 9 V.S.A. chapter 82A for food produced with genetic
engineering.
The report shall include:
(1)
a recommendation as to whether milk or milk products should be
subject to the requirements of 9 V.S.A. chapter 82A; and
(2)
the legal basis for the recommendation under subdivision (1) of this
subsection.
(b)
In exercise of the Attorney General’s authority to defend the interests of
the State, the Attorney General, in his or her discretion, may notify the General
Assembly that it is not in the best interest of the State to submit the report
required under subsection (a) of this section on or before January 15, 2015.
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Any notice submitted under this subsection shall estimate the date when the
report shall be submitted to the General Assembly.
Sec. 7.
EFFECTIVE DATES
(a)
This section and Secs. 3 (Attorney General rulemaking), 4 (genetically
engineered food labeling special fund), 5 (Attorney General budget fiscal year
2016), 6 (Attorney General report; milk) shall take effect on passage.
(b)
Secs. 1 (findings) and 2 (labeling of food produced with genetic
engineering) shall take effect on July 1, 2016.
(For text see House Journal May 10, 2014 )
H. 260
An act relating to electronic insurance notices and credit for reinsurance
The Senate proposes to the House to amend the bill as follows:
First:
By striking out Secs. 1, 2, and 3 (pertaining to electronic insurance
notices) in their entirety
Second:
In Sec. 4, 8 V.S.A. § 3634a (credit for reinsurance), in subdivision
(b)(5), by adding subdivision (H) to read as follows:
(H)
Credit for reinsurance ceded to a certified reinsurer shall be
permitted only for reinsurance contracts entered into or renewed on or after the
effective date of the certification of the assuming insurer by the Commissioner.
Third:
By striking out Sec. 5 (effective dates) in its entirety and by
inserting in lieu thereof a new Sec. 5 (renumbered as Sec. 2) to read as follows:
Sec. 2.
EFFECTIVE DATE
This act shall take effect on passage.
And by renumbering all the remaining sections of the bill to be numerically
correct
And that after passage the title of the bill be amended to read: “An act
relating to credit for reinsurance”.
(For text see House Journal February 4, 2014 )
H. 483
An act relating to adopting revisions to Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial
Code
First:
In Sec. 1, in § 9-801, by striking out the following: “2013” and
inserting in lieu thereof the following: 2014.
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Second:
In Sec. 2, by striking out the following: “2013” and inserting in
lieu thereof the following: 2014.
(For text see House Journal April 30, 2013 )
Ordered to Lie
S. 91
An act relating to privatization of public schools.
Pending Question: Shall the House propose to the Senate to amend the bill
as offered by Rep. Turner of Milton??
Consent Calendar
Concurrent Resolutions for Adoption Under Joint Rule 16a
The following concurrent resolutions have been introduced for approval by
the Senate and House and will be adopted automatically unless a Senator or
Representative
requests
floor
consideration
before
today’s
adjournment.
Requests for floor consideration in either chamber should be communicated to
the Secretary’s office and/or the House Clerk’s office, respectively.
For text of
resolutions, see Addendum to House Calendar and Senate Calendar of
4/17/2014.
H.C.R. 309
House concurrent resolution congratulating
the
Reporter
newspaper on
winning eight 2014 New England Newspaper and Press Association awards
H.C.R. 310
House concurrent resolution congratulating the Town of Weybridge on
winning State and Addison County honors in the Vermont Home Energy
Challenge
H.C.R. 311
House concurrent resolution congratulating 2014 Vermont Spelling Bee
champion, Liam Lustberg
H.C.R. 312
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 Division II Lyndon
Institute Vikings championship boys’ basketball team
H.C.R. 313
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 Proctor High School
Lady Phantoms Division IV championship girls’ basketball team
H.C.R. 314
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2013 Peoples Academy Lady
Wolves Division III championship girls’ soccer team
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H.C.R. 315
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 Danville High School
Division IV championship boys’ basketball team
H.C.R. 316
House concurrent resolution commemorating the third annual Turkic Cultural
Day in Vermont
H.C.R. 317
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 Mt. Abraham Union High
School Division II championship girls’ basketball team
H.C.R. 318
House concurrent resolution commemorating the 200th anniversary of the
Battle of Plattsburgh and honoring those who fought on Lake Champlain’s
western shore
H.C.R. 319
House concurrent resolution congratulating Chloe Johnson of Fairfield on her
service as the 2013 Miss Vermont Outstanding Teen
H.C.R. 320
House concurrent resolution in memory of Brandon Allen Gleason of
Enosburg Falls
H.C.R. 321
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 Black River High School
State rock climbing championship team
H.C.R. 322
House concurrent resolution designating April 23, 2014 as Iraq and
Afghanistan Veterans Honor and Appreciation Day and recognizing their
service and sacrifice on behalf of our nation
H.C.R. 323
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2014 University of Vermont
Catamounts America East Regular Season title winning men’s basketball team
H.C.R. 324
House concurrent resolution congratulating the Vermont-associated 2014 U.S.
Winter Olympic Team members
H.C.R. 325
House concurrent resolution congratulating Jeanelle Achee of Rochester on her
service as the 2013 Miss Vermont
H.C.R. 326
House concurrent resolution congratulating the 2013 Randolph Union High
School Galloping Ghosts Division II championship baseball team
H.C.R. 327
House concurrent resolution congratulating Madison Cota on being named the
2014 Miss Vermont Teen USA
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H.C.R. 328
House concurrent resolution commemorating the 150th anniversary of the St.
Albans Raid
H.C.R. 329
House concurrent resolution designating April 30, 2014 as National
Walk@Lunch Day in Vermont
S.C.R. 55
Senate concurrent resolution congratulating the NorthWoods Stewardship
Center on its 25th anniversary
Information Notice
All drafting requests for House Concurrent Resolutions must be in Michael
Chernick's hands by the end of the day on April 22nd.
Thank You.